The “Last Days” or The “Best Of Days”?

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I used to think that the greatness of a people or nation was dependent on their faith in God and their righteousness in keeping His Commandments. That when people became wicked and committed sins that they ‘lost the Spirit of God’ and started on a downward spiral toward their eventual doom. I believed ‘wickedness was not happiness’ and the further away from God people get, the more selfish, depraved and unhappy they would become.

As a Mormon we were taught that we lived in the Last Days before Christ returns. In the Bible as well as the Mormon scriptures there are many verses and even whole chapters which emphasise how close to the Second Coming of Christ we are.

[As an example read Matthew chapter 24 (http://www.lds.org/scriptures/nt/matt/24?lang=eng) and Mormon chapter 8 ( http://www.lds.org/scriptures/bofm/morm/8?lang=eng) ]

I was taught by Church leaders that we live in perilous times of great wickedness. Here’s just one example of the language used: “Now, my young friends, you need to appreciate that our days now and the days that lie ahead are ‘perilous.’  In this regard, President Boyd K. Packer has observed: “I know of nothing in the history of the Church or in the history of the world to compare with our present circumstances. Nothing happened in Sodom and Gomorrah which exceeds in wickedness and depravity that which surrounds us now.””  
Elder James J Hamula (The First Quorum of Seventy 2008)
(http://www.lds.org/general-conference/2008/10/winning-the-war-against-evil?lang=eng.)

As a young teenage boy going to school during the last days of the Cold War, I believed the prophecies in the scriptures and the words of the Latter-day Prophets of my Church would soon be coming to pass.

So much emphasis in Mormonism is placed on preparing for the ‘End Times’ that I was convinced I would not have time to finish my school studies before the Great Battle at Armegeddon commenced. As a family we prepared for the terrible times ahead by gathering our obligatory ‘years food supply’ together.

The message of those times was emphasised by the very presence of large storage containers of dried wheat stored in my bedroom. (I made good use out of them by placing a wooden board across some of them to make a study desk.)

All the time as a child and teenager I grew up in fear of imminent impending war. It was exciting watching the news and hearing about the ‘wars and rumours of wars’ and speculating on how soon Christ’s Second Coming would be.

The anticipation for the end times was increased by my Patriarchal Blessing where it specifically mentions my involvement in the Last Days. (“You are of Royal Heritage, Stephen, inasmuch as you descend from Ephraim who was so blessed by his father and his blessings are your blessings and all of the blessings given unto him are shared by you and you will be among those chosen people who are gathering the saints, preparing for the great judgement and sorting out of the tribes.”)

So great was my excitement for the Second Coming, and so strong was my belief in the prophecies of the ‘Signs of the Times’ about the Last Days that I anticipated that there would not be enough time for me to finish my high school education. I honestly believed the hype from the Church that the world was so wicked it was ripe for ‘the Harvest’ when the Wheat and the Tares would be separated very soon.

Most Mormons I know had similar  expectations to me. And most are still anticipating the Second Coming imminently.
Many Christian religions believe similar prophecies.

The problem with this thinking is it skews our perception of reality. We tend to see what we believe. So we see any and all violence, war and natural disaster as a ‘Sign of the Times’. With our limited perspective on terms of geographical location and time, it is all too easy to make generalizations about the whole world which are not accurate. As a normal human tendency we tend to see what we expect to see and ignore any evidence to the contrary. But worse than that, the media often feed our fears by over-sensationalizing the violence and disasters because it makes for more interesting viewing.

And if we add in tribal ‘in-group/out-group’ thinking we start comparing other religions, countries and communities to our own as a subconscious means to raise our self-esteem by feeling more righteous than others. In the Mormon Church they talk about ‘personal righteousness’, when really it’s just a clever disguise for feeling self-righteous!

I agree with my non-religious friend who sees the futility of this thinking:

“To think that we can deduce rises and declines of ‘greatness’ in this manner is absurd.  What is wrong with every country in the world becoming equally ‘great’?  Life is not a competition– if humanity does not learn to collaborate and cooperate for the good of all people everywhere, we fail, spiritually and biologically.  The moment we think is is important or necessary to be greater than anyone else, rather than focusing on our own abilities to improve for the greater good, we are the cause of the problem.  Start with the person in the mirror, and when you can say you are absolutely perfect, then judge others.

“As we are distracted by the symptoms of societal ego, that somehow we think being greater than any ‘other’– person, nation, culture, religious status… we seek out symptoms of human struggle to attack to make us feel superior or virtuous to (unsuccessfully) hide the guilt of not living up to our own potential.  Rather than looking through the eyes of compassion, which was what I thought Jesus taught (I guess I am wrong), we attack others (through words, thoughts or actions) instead of striving to better ourselves and lending a hand to those struggling along with us.  I don’t care what the flavor of the day is: issues of abortion, slavery, gay rights, guns… we are not paying attention to the root cause of why these things are issues in the first place– no matter what ‘side’ you are on.  Condemning other’s actions because at the time they are lost, unloved, unsupported, living from fear of attack by anyone for any reason… it has never worked, and never will.  If we have lost any ‘greatness’, it is because of our need to be better than others, which means others must ‘fail’, and the downward spiral continues.” ~ Kriste Brushaber

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On the other hand, by almost every statistical measurement it is very evident that most of us actually live in the best of times. This has to be the best time to live on this planet since humans evolved.

We must be doing something right. Just look below at all the 31 charts for evidence that times are good. http://www.businessinsider.com/charts-that-will-restore-your-faith-in-humanity-2013-5

Having been brought up believing we lived in the Last Days before Christ returns, and that the world is getting more violent and wicked. I grew up in fear. I now realise that my fear was fed by my cynically manipulative belief system – Mormonism. 

Just two and a half years ago I had a marvelous epiphany. I realised my faith in Mormonism was misguided. After coming to understand how I, and my parents and siblings, had been sold a lie, I realised that the world is not about to end.

All of a sudden the world appeared to be more beautiful and wonderful than I ever believed it was. With more joy and love than I believed existed.

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My paradigm, or world view, changed when I realised my biased world view was being influenced unduly by other people in a church which was manipulating me for its own ends.

I now have less fear and more hope than ever before.

I feel more connected with the earth and humanity than I ever imagined was possible.

The world has its problems, that’s for sure, but it isn’t helped by scare-mongering by religious institutions whose agenda is to control the minds of their adherents where the inevitable conclusion would be catastrophe for the world with the results of self-fulfilling prophecies.

There is wonderful evidence for the good that is happening in the world.

Steven Pinker recently published a book detailing that evidence:

The Better Angels of Our Nature – The Decline of Violence in History & its Causes. (By Steven Pinker)

http://stevenpinker.com/publications/better-angels-our-nature

A review:
“This book is about what may be the most important thing that has ever happened in human history. Believe it or not-and I know that most people do not-violence has declined over long stretches of time, and today we may be living in the most peaceable era in our species’ existence.

“What could be more fundamental to our sense of meaning and purpose than a conception of whether the strivings of the human race over long stretches of time have left us better or worse off?

“How, in particular, are we to make sense of modernity-of the erosion of family, tribe, tradition, and religion by the forces of individualism, cosmopolitanism, reason, and science?

“So much depends on how we understand the legacy of this transition: whether we see our world as a nightmare of crime, terrorism, genocide, and war, or as a period that, by the standards of history, is blessed by unprecedented levels of peaceful coexistence.

“Our cognitive faculties predispose us to believe that we live in violent times, especially when they are stoked by media that follow the watchword “If it bleeds, it leads.’

“Also distorting our sense of danger is our moral psychology. No one has ever recruited activists to a cause by announcing that things are getting better, and bearers of good news are often advised to keep their mouths shut lest they lull people into complacency.

“…the mind is a complex system of cognitive and emotional faculties implemented in the brain which owe their basic design to the processes of evolution. Some of these faculties incline us toward various kinds of violence. Others-“the better angels of our nature,” in Abraham Lincoln’s Words- incline us toward cooperation and peace. The way to explain the decline of violence is to identify the changes in our cultural and material milieu that have given our peaceable motives the upper hand.” ~ Steven Pinker

See Steven Pinker talk about the main topics of his book as he lectures at Stanford University:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8_sjosc0r1w&feature=youtube_gdata_player

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I agree with my wise friend Kriste Brushaber when she says that maybe these are both the ‘Last Days’ and the ‘Best of Days’.

The ‘Last Days’ of an outdated mode of thinking which served humanity well in the past, but is not capable of taking us forward to a far richer and brighter future for humanity.

And the ‘Best of Days’ as we learn to pool our collective resources of thoughts, talents, energy, passion, money, time and actions to contribute to that beautiful and bright future!

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This entry was posted in Mormon Issues, Religious Epiphany, TRUTH. Bookmark the permalink.

10 Responses to The “Last Days” or The “Best Of Days”?

  1. Robert Bridgstock says:

    Enjoyed this article Steve.
    I am increasingly aware that LDS in generally tend to think that it is not possible to be really ‘good’ without their religion. It is as if they have not noticed the millions of lovely people, both near and far, who have incredible integrity, compassion and love — and they are not Mormon!
    I could do no better here than to put below, a small piece out of my forthcoming book:
    The problem of how a person is to be judged or valued by God (or us if we dare) has absolutely nothing to do with conformity or obedience to any religion. The real state of a person’s soul is a complex matter best left to God and not the men who play God. That Mormonism cultivates a view of the soul (our inner spirit) altogether too shallow, is observed by the manner in which it seeks to control and deny the existence of that soul. It does not deny it literally – it fully believes in it, but in its dealings with those who struggle; it speaks, admonishes and acts, as if that spirit did not exist!
    The Church will not acknowledge your essence. They will acknowledge the actual existence of the spirit within your body, but refuse to appreciate, respect or understand its quintessence and manifestation through you. That alone is a fundamental rejection of who you are! For my present argument; it does not matter a jot whether you wish to identify your spirit with a God, or just consider it your unique individual selfhood. Either way, they totally underestimate you – your sanctity and presence. It has taken me all my life to notice the tendency for all leaders to under-value and disregard the sheer beauty, sacredness and autonomy of a human soul. It is as if we were empty and only needing to be filled with their opinions and their way of seeing things – their way of being. The Mormon Church’s inability and refusal to understand the amazing capacity of the human spirit to guide us into independence from the control of others, with its inherent, inevitable connection to the transcendent things of life – regardless of obedience to any religion; is the most astonishing truth I have learnt since I was excommunicated from Mormonism!

    I would say my soul does not actually need religion – it is religion! It never did need it – I was just drawn to religion because I had lost touch with my soul. It is its own spiritual compass and guidance system. Yes, religion can assist us, but not replace us. Too often people submit to religion because they have not discovered the beauty of who they are. Unfortunately, once they have discovered it by joining a Church as radical as Mormonism, then that identity becomes flawed or compromised by the dogmatism within it. Our identity is hijacked or controlled through the degree to which we ‘allow it’ to be absorbed through conformity and conditioning. In essence, the soul is partly compromised, because it not only belongs to you – it belongs so much to them!

    • SteveBloor says:

      Hi Robert,

      Firstly. Thank you for your kind remarks.

      Coming from you, as an author, they are even more appreciated.
      Secondly, I feel privileged to read a small excerpt from your upcoming book. It is very profound. I recognise the problem you identify in Mormonism. Since leaving myself I have begun to feel a sense of authenticity and connection with nature and humanity which I had never imagined possible when I had the Mormon mindset.

      When is your book to be published?

      Thanks once again,
      Steve

      • robert bridgstock says:

        Hi Steve,
        Thank you. The book is due out in September; entitled: ‘The Youngest Bishop in England.’ As I may have said in the past, I have been waiting a considerable time for the Publisher to get a moving. Now it seems, we are nearly there. Trouble is — it has been so long, I wish I could re-write it! Never mind! When I actually receive the advance edited version, I’ll start making noises about it across various web sites… I just dread my children knowing that it is on the market! Good news though; without me saying a word, my eldest son in Canada (he teaches Gospel Doctrine) is now aware that the Church is false, but does not quite know what to do about it. I have sent him a number of articles and recommended good books to read on the real history. When he first revealed his doubts to me via email, I was shocked out of my brain! You see, he did–years ago– write a book on the Smith family which was published (Very pro church) but his extensive reading has revealed some major anomalous, which have greatly troubled him. I am carefully trying to support, without pushing too hard.
        I appreciate your blogs. All such communications, feel like rain after a long dry spell.
        Kind Regards
        Bob

      • SteveBloor says:

        That’s great news Bob.

        I rejoice whenever I hear about a member of the Church discovering the hoax that has been carried out. I also feel their pain as they suffer the trauma of the cognitive dissonance associated with coming to terms with the truth.

        It’s a good thing your son has you to confide in and give him support.

        If there’s an opportunity, and you feel it is appropriate, please pass on my best wishes. I remember I got on well with your sons.

        Also, if you, or your son, felt the need to join a British ex-Mormon Facebook forum we would be delighted to have you join us.

        I’ve found the group to be wonderfully empathetic and supportive. Tom Phillips is a part of it too, who you may know.

        Let me know if and when you’re interested and I’ll formerly invite you in.

        Wishing you all the best,
        Steve

  2. Good Will says:

    A very strange post, Steve.

    I concur with you that the “end times” prognostications and “scare-mongering” among the LDS were detrimental to ALL of us. I too feared war, famine, holocaust, etc. I could have been more “up-beat”.

    But the claim that “[n]o one has ever recruited activists to a cause by announcing that things are getting better” is patently false. In fact, the truth that “things are getting better” is what the “Good News” is all about! Sin, death and hell have been overcome!

    Your “luxuriating” in the comfort of knowing that “life is good” (with all the attendant “indicators” mentioned in your post) is sadly myopic and self-centered. You measure “good” in the space of one short lifespan (yours). Your charts are deceptively selective. We have just emerged from a prior century in which godless despots, tyrants and fiends murdered more innocents than have perhaps been murdered in all of earth’s long history. Why don’t your charts include the decades preceding the 1950s — the “golden age” of modern Americanism and world peace (Korea excluded)? In fact, so many of the “blessings” you take comfort in now are the direct result of God-fearing, faithful, sacrificing, altruistic, religious people fighting pure evil in these “last days”. Could the fact that you are not personally touched by all that you now decry as “scare-mongering” be because you have been personally blessed by all that you once believed and lived? I think so.

    You are like the guy dining in the restaurant on the Titanic after it hit the ice berg. “We’re still moving forward, aren’t we? The lights are on! The food has never tasted better! Nobody’s been hurt!”

    Meanwhile, marriage and family are collapsing. Sexual immorality is rampant. Statistics like infant mortality and death from child birth are down only because scientific advancement, unencumbered by religious and moral restraint has allowed doctors and mothers to kill their pre-born children in record numbers. It’s “great” for you, but what about for them?

    Slavery has diminished? The Powers That Be have discovered a means to circumvent the US’s 14th amendment. By taxation and economic manipulation, now ALL are enslaved to a malevolent, self-serving financial bureaucracy. The bankers and governments of the world are become one. Constitutions mean nothing. A global police state is emerging. Privacy and freedom are on the wane.

    I mean this with all sincerity and I don’t wish to rain on your parade of “happy thoughts” and “blessings” — because our blessings are real and positive attitudes are to be encouraged. (He has overcome the world!) But your dismissal of divine warnings is reminiscent of the sentiments of the people of Ammonihah, who, having rejected Alma the Younger’s teachings, boasted of their greatness and the “impossibility” of them being ripe for destruction. For them, the end came quicker than expected.

    Could this “long delay” in the latter (not “last”) days be evidence of God’s mercy, rather than His non-existence?

    Look, Steve, I concur with you on many things. The LDS faith is grossly gone astray. We live far below our privileges. In fact, in many ways we living a religion that is very different from that practiced by Jesus…or even Joseph Smith. We have gone astray. And no doubt if you were experiencing now the same “blessings” they enjoyed — revelations, visions, healings, power in the priesthood, spiritual gifts — you wouldn’t be “disbelieving” now.

    You rightly now reject the many instances of “delusions” that were (and are) commonly purported by the LDS to be “spiritual promptings” and “miracles” (though “hunches” and “proper medicine” more often deserve the real credit).

    But have you ever entertained angels? Or seen the Christ? Have you received the heavenly gift? If so, how could you now disbelieve?

    May I recommend perusing
    this blog
    (beginning at the beginning and working your way forward in time). I have been greatly rewarded by doing so.

    –Will

    • SteveBloor says:

      Dear Will,

      I appreciate you reading my blog, but you must remember that you are not my intended audience. I am not trying to deconvert anyone. My only objective is to share my insights with fellow questioners as I transition out of Mormonism.

      I will attempt to answer your challenges this time as it allows me to further elucidate upon some points in my main post.

      The first thing I need to say to you though is thank you for taking the time to comment. I would also highly recommend that you take the time to watch the talk by Steven Pinker that he gave at Stanford University, otherwise we’re arguing without the facts. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8_sjosc0r1w&feature=youtube_gdata_player

      In response to your comments:

      Good Will:
      “Your ‘luxuriating’ in the comfort of knowing that ‘life is good’ (with all the attendant ‘indicators’ mentioned in your post) is sadly myopic and self-centered. You measure ‘good’ in the space of one short lifespan (yours). Your charts are deceptively selective.”
      Me:
      Will, on the contrary, I base it on evidence from thousands of years of data, including Medieval History, & the data regarding violence over the last 800 years. On every scale of physical violence there are far fewer wars, those wars which do occur are smaller & shorter with far fewer casualties than before. This includes relative & actual deaths due to violence.

      There are far fewer civil wars than ever before in human history with tiny numbers of casualties compared to over 100 years ago.

      Even the 2nd World War, though horrific for those involved, was small in terms of casualties relative to the total world population, being at most 3.1%. Wheras that figure was estimated at 8% for the Taiping Rebellion in the 1800s. And 17% for the Mongol invasions of the 13th & 14th centuries.

      Good Will:
      “We have just emerged from a prior century in which godless despots, tyrants and fiends murdered more innocents than have perhaps been murdered in all of earth’s long history.”
      Me:
      Sadly for those involved, the casualties in just small periods of time pre-20th Century were horrendous. The Taiping Rebellion alone has estimates of upto 100,000,000 casualties.

      Good Will:
      “Why don’t your charts include the decades preceding the 1950s — the ‘golden age’ of modern Americanism and world peace (Korea excluded)? In fact, so many of the ‘blessings’ you take comfort in now are the direct result of God-fearing, faithful, sacrificing, altruistic, religious people fighting pure evil in these ‘last days’. Could the fact that you are not personally touched by all that you now decry as ‘scare-mongering’ be because you have been personally blessed by all that you once believed and lived? I think so.”

      Me:
      I’m very grateful for all those who have fought against violence & oppression in the past. Religious & secular combined. Interestingly, the least violent nations in the World also happen to be the least religious. http://warofwordsforum.wordpress.com/2013/01/16/good-without-god-a-global-trend/

      In fact, over the thousands of years of human history it has been the trend for the most religious countries to justify violence, including war & slavery, by virtue of their religion.

      I do not accept that religion is required for morality. Even Chimpanzees exhibit moral behaviour.

      Good Will:
      “You are like the guy dining in the restaurant on the Titanic after it hit the ice berg. “We’re still moving forward, aren’t we? The lights are on! The food has never tasted better! Nobody’s been hurt!””

      “Meanwhile, marriage and family are collapsing. Sexual immorality is rampant. Statistics like infant mortality and death from child birth are down only because scientific advancement, unencumbered by religious and moral restraint has allowed doctors and mothers to kill their pre-born children in record numbers. It’s ‘great’ for you, but what about for them?”

      Me:
      How insulting! I’m sorry, but you miss my point. I’m not saying there are no problems in the World. I’m saying that fear-mongering by religion is not the best way to combine our collective efforts to improve the World. I believe Secular Humanism has the best chance of keeping the peace & making the World a much better place to live for all life, including humans.

      Best regards,
      Steve

  3. Good Will says:

    Steve: “I’m saying that fear-mongering by religion is not the best way to combine our collective efforts to improve the World.”

    I agree with you on that!

    However, never before has mankind possessed technology capable of destroying the world as we can now. Your touted “theology” of Secular Humanism has produced the likes of Lenin, Hitler, Stalin, Mao, and Pol Pot who who have unleashed untold horrors on the earth, who did all they could to compel others (on pain of death) to submit to their will. Misguided religions (such as radical Islam) do likewise. If these entities alone possessed the power to utterly annihilate their enemies, no doubt they would use it to further their ends (at the expense of everyone else).

    Meanwhile, Christ taught “Bless them that curse you. Do good to them that hate you and despitefully use you and persecute you.” Do you think the greatest secular humanists of the 20th century practiced that “morality”?

    100,000,000 people were killed last century alone largely without the use of nuclear or biological technology. What does our future hold when one or more of these types gets control of such technology? We’ll just have to wait to see. (The future does not bode well.)

    Unfortunately, Secular Humanism (and misguided religious folks, in general) have a poor record of “keeping the peace”.

    The sad truth is that “Christian” America is the greatest force for evil and violence in the world today. Is that because of our Christianity? Or because we have abandoned our Christianity? I hold to the latter.

    When life holds no promise of life hereafter, indeed, of any enduring purpose or value beyond the grave, the tendency of rational beings is to “get the most they can while they can.” (Look at the Baby Boomers here in the U.S., sucking the Social Security system dry, their posterity be damned! In fact, animals behave this way. It’s a “dog eat dog world” out there.) What motivates a guy to jump on a hand grenade for his friend (or for a total stranger), if this life is “all” there is? What would be the point, if we’re all just a randomly assembled collection of atoms and molecules, not possessing of agency or life hereafter? How does my death benefit me, or even benefit you, if we all are just destined for disposal in the great dustbin of oblivion? Your “answers” — even observations of evident feelings of “peace” and “happiness” now — really mean nothing, in the long run, assuming you actually believe in your “science”. For, if you are correct, then all is for naught.

    But I digress.

    I didn’t mean to insult you with my Titanic analogy. I did observe something noteworthy today, however, that I found rather curious (inspired by your blog, actually!). Those who reject the gospel are “self-selecting” for damnation. We all must receive further light and knowledge (from someone or somewhere or somehow) in order to progress and advance. A teacher can be very instructive — indispensible, even! — in learning as much and a quickly as possible. (Our progress is restrained inasmuch as we wait every few centuries for a Galileo or an Einstein! As someone said “When God wants to change the world, He sends a baby!”)

    But you don’t believe in supernatural teachers, divine beings, divine revelation, per se (if said knowledge comes from or pertains to Christ, His angels, or His prophets). Certainly you reject the Mormon theology and cosmology. Therefore, you don’t place yourself in any position to receive further knowledge “at the veil”.

    God doesn’t damn anyone. He doesn’t kick anyone out of His kingdom. Disbelievers eject themselves, willfully, by their own disbelief. They refuse to climb onto (or remain in) the Celestial Bus. Thus, they are left to themselves, to fend for themselves, for all the good it does them.

    And, apparently, as you’ve pointed out, there’s a lot of good to be found in kingdoms not of His world.

    To each his own.

    • SteveBloor says:

      Dear Good Will,

      You obviously haven’t watched the talk by Steven Pinker yet. He covers the topic of nuclear deterrents.

      As for the old ‘Hitler was an atheist’ and that’s also the reason Stalin, Pol Pot and Mao etc committed atrocities, please don’t try that one unless you credit me with no intelligence.

      You cannot honestly believe that the Killing Fields, the Gulag and the Holocaust were the result of societies that became too attached to critical thinking, or too demanding of evidence.

      It may surprise you to discover that my problem is not with Mormonism per se, or even religion, it is with dogma. With the belief that it is acceptable, even admirable, to believe propositions without good evidence or without good reasons for believing those propositions to be true.

      “Reason and evidence and empiricism and science and liberal democracy – in short, the forces of the Enlightenment – have destroyed Communist and Fascist dogmas. Now it is time to do the same to the dogmas of religious faith.”

      Good Will, I bid you adeiu.
      Steve

    • David Bloor says:

      “The sad truth is that “Christian” America is the greatest force for evil and violence in the world today. Is that because of our Christianity? Or because we have abandoned our Christianity? I hold to the latter”.

      Is this based on the assumption that America acts on altruistic morality or pure self interest? I tend to believe the latter. Either way, America, though far from being a perfect example of morality based upon their own shocking, world beating crime rate, it is a safer bet than the likes of China or Russia.

  4. Stormin says:

    Liked your thoughts. Especially, “All of a sudden the world appeared to be more beautiful and wonderful than I ever believed it was. With more joy and love than I believed existed. ” That is certainly what I have felt after leaving the scam/hoax LDS church and getting a more personnel relationship with God! Keep up the good work!

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