I KNEW I Knew.

For most of my 47 years on planet earth I KNEW I Knew certain things about the purpose of life and the Plan of Salvation.

Then, unexpectedly, and most certainly unintentionally, I became aware of certain facts about my belief system that I had not been aware, and had in fact been strongly discouraged from reading.

These facts are not disputed by my Church, just seen as “truths which are not very helpful!”

So now I’m left in the uncomfortable position of KNOWING I Don’t Know!

But feeling humbled by my new sense of humanity.

Feeling connected to my fellow human beings, feeling grateful to know that this is my ‘one life’. So now I can live it to the full and not need to judge others or worry about preparing for an afterlife I’ll probably never get.

Having two epiphanies in the space of a year has been very traumatic, but very valuable. It’s truly humbling to realise I don’t “know” I know any more.

At the same time, after lots of sleepless nights trying to come to terms with it all, it is exciting to be open to more truth.

To “know” I don’t know is actually very refreshing, disconcerting at first, but humbling and strangely humanising.

Which is more useful: Feeling Validated Versus Seeking Truth?

Psychology research:
People sometimes seek the truth, but most prefer like-minded views:
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090701082720.htm

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2 Responses to I KNEW I Knew.

  1. Good Will says:

    Steve, you wrote:

    “Feeling connected to my fellow human beings, feeling grateful to know that this is my ‘one life’. So now I can live it to the full and not need to judge others or worry about preparing for an afterlife I’ll probably never get.”

    This was the first expression of “faithlessness” I’ve encountered while reading your blog (chronologically). How did you go from “believing” to “not believing” (in anything supernatural, Christ-, LDS-related)?

    Am I reading more (or less) into this than is here?

    –Will

    • SteveBloor says:

      My rational mind started to whir into action a few months prior to my religious epiphany, as I realised that my professional (podiatry) paradigm of most feet needing support from shoes & orthotics was grossly flawed. It was about a year prior when I started to think critically & analytically & realised I needed to question everything, even why my testimony of the gospel was based on feelings.

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